Make us homepage
Add to Favorites
FAIL (the browser should render some flash content, not this).

Main page » Audiobooks

Sort by: date | rating | most visited | comments | alphabetically

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5


Simon Blackburn - Plato's Republic
9
 
 

Simon Blackburn - Plato's Republic
Plato is perhaps the most significant philosopher who has ever lived and The Republic, composed in Athens in about 375 BC, is widely regarded as his most famous dialogue. Its discussion of the perfect city —  and the perfect mind  — laid the foundations for Western culture and, for over two thousand years, has been the cornerstone of Western philosophy. As the distinguished professor Simon Blackburn points out, it has probably sustained more commentary, and been subject to more radical and impassioned disagreement...

REUPLOAD NEEDED

 
  More..
The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry (AudioBook)
65
 
 
The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry (AudioBook)Jim and Della Dillingham Young are a couple very much in love. But they can barely afford their one-room apartment. What sacrifices will they make to buy each other the perfect Christmas gifts? 
REUPLOAD NEEDED
 
  More..
Secret sharer by Joseph Conrad
10
 
 

Secret sharer by Joseph ConradSecret sharer by Joseph Conrad

The story takes place at sea, near the Gulf of Siam, and is told from the perspective of a young nameless Captain. The captain is unfamiliar with both his ship and his crew, having only joined their company a fortnight earlier. The Captain is furthermore unsure of himself, questioning his ability to fulfill the role of such an authoritative figure. These themes are explored through symbols throughout the novella.

Reuploaded Thanks to floarea

 
  More..
Ligeia and Morella by E. A. Poe [unabridged audiobooks without text]
28
 
 

Ligeia and Morella by E. A. Poe [unabridged audiobooks without text]Vincent Price [1911 - 1993] is best remembered for his distinctive voice and serio-comic attitude in a series of distinctive horror films. His tall 6' 4" (1.93 m) stature and polished urbane manner made him something of an American counterpart to the older Boris Karloff. In the 1960s, he had a number of low-budget successes with Roger Corman and American International Pictures (AIP) including the Edgar Allan Poe adaptations House of Usher (1960), The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), Tales of Terror (1962), The Raven (1963), The Masque of the Red Death (1964) and The Tomb of Ligeia (1965).
// From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reuploaded Thanks to floarea

 
  More..
Jules Verne - A Journey to the Center of the Earth
24
 
 

Jules Verne - A Journey to the Center of the EarthWhat a stunning discovery: an old, coded note that actually contains directions for reaching the Earth's very core! And once he finds it, renowned geologist Professor Liedenbrock can't resist setting out with his 16-year-old nephew to go where only one man has gone before. Jules Verne takes young readers on one of the most incredible journeys ever imagined, from Iceland's frozen tundra far down into fantastic underground prehistoric worlds and back up again through the fires of an erupting volcano.

Reuploaded Thanks to floarea


 
  More..
A Farewell to Arms - Ernest Hemingway (Audiobook)
4
 
 

A Farewell to Arms - Ernest Hemingway (Audiobook)A Farewell to Arms - Ernest Hemingway (Audiobook)

A Farewell to Arms is a novel by Ernest Hemingway set during the Italian campaign of World War I. The book, published in 1929, is a first-person account of American Frederic Henry, serving as a Lieutenant ("Tenente") in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army. The title is taken from a poem by 16th-century English dramatist George Peele.
A Farewell to Arms is about a love affair between the expatriate American Henry and Catherine Barkley against the backdrop of the First World War, cynical soldiers, fighting and the displacement of populations. The publication of A Farewell to Arms cemented Hemingway's stature as a modern American writer.

 
  More..
The New Scientist - Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?
10
 
 

The New Scientist - Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?The New Scientist - Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?

This is the latest compilation of readers' answers to the questions in the 'Last Word' column of New Scientist, the world's best-selling science weekly. Following the phenomenal success of DOES ANYTHING EAT WASPS? - the Christmas 2005 surprise bestseller - this new collection includes recent answers never before published in book form, and also old favourites from the column's early days. Yet again, many seemingly simple questions turn out to have complex answers. And some that seem difficult ... 

REUPLOAD NEEDED

 
  More..