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The Romantic Moderns : English Writers, Artists and the Imagination from Virginia Woolf to John Piper
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The Romantic Moderns : English Writers, Artists and the Imagination from Virginia Woolf to John PiperWinner of the 2010 Guardian First Book Award: a groundbreaking reassessment of English cultural life in the thirties and forties.
In the 1930s and 1940s, while the battles for modern art and modern society were being fought in Paris and Spain, it seemed to some a betrayal that John Betjeman and John Piper were in love with a provincial world of old churches and tea shops.
 
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5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature 2018
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5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature 2018Get ready to ace your AP English Literature Exam with this easy-to-follow, multi-platform study guide
5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature 2018 Elite Student Edition introduces an effective 5-step study plan to help you build the skills, knowledge, and test-taking confidence you need to achieve a high score on the exam. This popular test prep guide matches the latest course syllabus and latest exam. You'll get online help, six full-length practice tests (three in the book and three online), detailed answers to each question, study tips, and important information on how the exam is scored.
 
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A is for Arsenic : the Poisons of Agatha Christie
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A is for Arsenic : the Poisons of Agatha ChristiePeople are fascinated by murder. The popularity of murder mystery books, TV series, and even board games shows that there is an appetite for death, and the more unusual or macabre the method, the better. With gunshots or stabbings the cause of death is obvious, but poisons are inherently more mysterious. How are some compounds so deadly in such tiny amounts?
Agatha Christie used poison to kill her characters more often than any other crime fiction writer. The poison was a central part of the novel, and her choice of deadly substances was far from random; the chemical and physiological characteristics of each poison provide vital clues to the discovery of the murderer. 
 
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Who Was Edgar Allan Poe?
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Who Was Edgar Allan Poe?Filled with broken hearts and black ravens, Edgar Allan Poe’s ghastly tales have delighted readers for centuries. Born in Boston in 1809, Poe was orphaned at age two. He was soon adopted by a Virginia family who worked as tombstone merchants. In 1827 he enlisted in the Army and subsequently failed out of West Point. His first published story, The Raven, was a huge success, but his joy was overshadowed by the death of his wife. Poe devoted his life to writing and his tragic life often inspired his work.
 
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Shades of the Planet: American Literature as World Literature
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Shades of the Planet: American Literature as World LiteratureIn a globalizing age, studying American literature in isolation from the rest of the world seems less and less justified. But is the conceptual box of the nation dispensable? And what would American literature look like without it?Leading scholars take up this debate in Shades of the Planet, beginning not with the United States as center, but with the world as circumference.
 
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The Literary Culture of Plague in Early Modern England
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The Literary Culture of Plague in Early Modern EnglandThis book is about the literary culture that emerged during and in the aftermath of the Great Plague of London (1665). Textual transmission impacted upon and simultaneously was impacted by the events of the plague. This book examines the role of print and manuscript cultures on representations of the disease through micro-histories and case studies of writing from that time, interpreting the place of these media and the construction of authorship during the outbreak. The macabre history of plague in early modern England largely ended with the Great Plague of London, and the miscellany of plague writings that responded to the epidemic forms the subject of this book.
 
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Fictions of Friendship in the Eighteenth-Century Novel
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Fictions of Friendship in the Eighteenth-Century NovelThis book explores the reciprocal influence of friendship ideals and narrative forms in eighteenth-century British fiction. It examines how various novelists, from Samuel Richardson to Mary Shelley, drew upon classical and early modern conceptions of true amity as a model of collaborative pedagogy. Analyzing authors, their professional circumstances, and their audiences, the study shows how the rhetoric of friendship became a means of paying deference to the increasing power of readerships, while it also served as a semi-covert means to persuade resistant readers and confront aesthetic and moral debates head on.
 
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