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English National Identity and Football Fan Culture: Who Are Ya?
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English National Identity and Football Fan Culture: Who Are Ya?

In recent years, scholars have understood the increasing use of the St George's Cross by football fans to be evidence of a rise in a specifically 'English' identity which has emerged as part of a wider 'national' response to broader political processes such as devolution and European integration which have fragmented identities within the UK. Using the controversial figurational sociological approach advocated by the twentieth-century theorist Norbert Elias, this book challenges such a view, drawing on ethnographic research amongst fans to explore the precise nature of the relationship between contemporary English national identity and football fan culture.
 
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American Politics: A Very Short Introduction
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American Politics: A Very Short Introduction

American politics seems to grow more contentious and complicated by the day, and whether American democracy works well is hotly debated. Amidst all this roiling partisan argument and confusing claims and counterclaims, there has never been a greater need for an impartial primer on the basics of the American political system.
For anyone wishing to understand the nuts and bolts of how our political system works--and sometimes fails to work--this Very Short Introduction is the very best place to start.
 
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Wall Street: A History, Updated Edition
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Wall Street: A History, Updated Edition

This updated edition covers the historic, almost apocalyptic events of the 2008 financial crisis and the overarching policy changes of the Obama administration. As Wall Street and America have changed irrevocably after the crisis, Charles R. Geisst offers the definitive chronicle of the relationship between the two, and the challenges and successes it has fostered that have shaped our history.
 
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Shakespeare in America: An Anthology from the Revolution to Now
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Shakespeare in America: An Anthology from the Revolution to Now

“The history of Shakespeare in America,” writes James Shapiro in his introduction to this groundbreaking anthology, “is also the history of America itself.” Shakespeare was a central, inescapable part of America’s literary inheritance, and a prism through which crucial American issues—revolution, slavery, war, social justice—were refracted and understood.
 
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Tourism and Archaeology
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Tourism and ArchaeologyTourism and Archaeology

The global popularity and lucrative potential of tourism has made sustainability a major concern for archaeologists, site managers, politicians, local communities, tourism officials, and other stakeholders. This book establishes new, interdisciplinary ground for tourism and archaeology that will foster a new generation of sustainable thinking and practice. First, three teams of co-authors from both disciplines tackle key conceptual dilemmas: exploration vs. exploitation, education vs. entertainment, and cultural sensitivity vs. embeddedness.
 
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The Modernist Novel: A Critical Introduction
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The Modernist Novel: A Critical IntroductionThe Modernist Novel: A Critical Introduction

Leading scholar Stephen Kern offers a probing analysis of the modernist novel, encompassing American, British and European works. Organized thematically, the book offers a comprehensive analysis of the stunningly original formal innovations in novels by Conrad, Joyce, Woolf, Proust, Gide, Faulkner, Dos Passos, Kafka, Musil and others. Kern contextualizes and explains how formal innovations captured the dynamic history of the period, reconstructed as ten master narratives. He also draws briefly on poetry and painting of the first half of the twentieth century.
 
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The Language of Stories: A Cognitive Approach
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The Language of Stories: A Cognitive Approach

How do we read stories? How do they engage our minds and create meaning? Are they a mental construct, a linguistic one or a cultural one? What is the difference between real stories and fictional ones? This book addresses such questions by describing the conceptual and linguistic underpinnings of narrative interpretation. Barbara Dancygier discusses literary texts as linguistic artifacts, describing the processes which drive the emergence of literary meaning. If a text means something to someone, she argues, there have to be linguistic phenomena that make it possible.
 
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